Tag: Female Anti-Slavery Society

Lucretia (1793- 1880) and James (1788 - 1868) Mott were a power couple. By the time of the Civil War, Lucretia and James Mott were elder statespersons in the abolition movement. Lucretia also became a leading voice for women's suffrage, and she and James attended the first Women's Rights Convention at Seneca Falls. Both were supporters of John Brown and cared for Mary Brown in their home in Philadelphia after John Brown was hanged at Harper's Ferry. The training camp for black troops, Camp William Penn, was built on land owned by Union League member Edward M. Davis, the...

The granddaughter of Cyrus Bustill, a founder of the Free African Society in 1787 in Philadelphia, Sarah Mapps was an educator, writer, public lecturer, amateur artist, and abolitionist. As an artist, she often put painted images on her signed letters. Many examples of these survive today and are the earliest surviving examples of signed painting by an African American woman. At one time Sarah considered becoming a medical doctor and was the first African American women to attend the Women's Medical College in Philadelphia. After a year, she changed directions and became a teacher at the Institute for Colored...

en English
X